We get that you want someone at every step

New funding can drive exciting growth opportunities, but also increased pressure. It helps to have someone who’s got your back. We are your PwC.

Susie Simpson, Private Business Scotland and helping hand

It’s a big decision for many private businesses, striking the right balance between raising funding for growth and the stress and strain it can put on your structure and your people. Whilst preparing for the next chapter can be exciting, change – for you and those around you – can feel a little daunting. Like climbing a steep hill at a sprint.

Bringing in a new investor might mean new reporting requirements, increased expectations and differing demands on you and your people that you haven’t experienced before. Whatever you are facing, it’s likely Susie and her team have seen it before. They can share the burden and help you plan and anticipate the needs of new stakeholders, so you don’t feel on the back foot. They can help you manage change for the better. Whatever your situation, Susie will bring her experience of working with different clients, meaning a better outcome for you, your business and your people.

Insights

Corporate Governance: Time to act

Corporate Governance: Time to act

Following the recent adoption of the new Corporate Governance reporting regulations extending sustainable and responsible governance practices to U.K. private limited companies, those businesses will need to quickly assess their corporate governance framework and reporting to be compliant from 1 January 2019.

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Private businesses are increasingly using debt finance to fund transactions with shareholders. Is this appropriate for you?

Private businesses are increasingly using debt finance to fund transactions with shareholders. Is this appropriate for you?

Having grown their business successfully over a number of years, shareholders can often find that they have a sizeable proportion of their personal and family wealth tied up in one business. Often, shareholdings in a company can end-up split amongst founders and their “friends and family”, who may have helped support the entrepreneurs with startup capital.

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