Transcript - Tech She Can Charter's second anniversary

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Voiceover: Today we’re here to celebrate the second anniversary, and birthday for Tech She Can.

Catherine O’Neill: The first meeting I was invited along to was in this tiny room and the next meeting I came along to was in an enormous room. It has expanded so much in such a short time.

Sheridan Ash: By getting more women into the workforce, we get all their creativity and their innovation skills and better products and services that are fit for all people.

The very famous quote from Chairman Mao who said that women hold up half the sky, well I like to think that the sky is not our limit. I like to think that we are moving the clouds away and we’re shining the sun on what the opportunities are for women and girls in the technology business and that can only mean a more equal world.

Robyn Howard: Over the last two years we’ve achieved so much. For instance we launched TechWeCan.org, we’ve launched in Scotland, we’ve got plans to launch in the North, Midlands and Wales. We’ve just got so many powerful organisations part of a great network and doing something really inspiring.

Sandy Lacey-Aberdein: I’ve always been talking about apprenticeships, because for me its a really important way to generate opportunities for people who would not normally get those opportunities. We’re encouraging females to apply. We’ve got three times as many females in this process because of our advertising, because of our promotion of Tech She Can.

Becky Patel: The world of work is changing so rapidly that we need to ensure that the children have a really broad knowledge of what may be out there in ten years time when they graduate.

Wincie Wong: We have a total of 12 lessons plans up on our TechWeCan.org website and they can be taught by any teacher whether they are in music, or arts, or a math or science teacher

Cathy O’Neill: One of the main things you can do is to promote the Tech We Can lesson plans in schools you are involved with. That’s one of the most important ways to get involved and it doesn’t cost anything, just a bit of your time.

Clair Reid: I went into my own primary school myself and rolled out the Tech We Can lesson plan for Safety and Security. I was a bit nervous about it because I’m not a teacher or trained to teach but I was overwhelmed with interest in my organisation for people to get involved

Sian Allsop: I studied history at university and yet I’ve had more than 20 years working in technology. It’s something I feel passionate about and I really really want to see more women coming through our doors as technologists.

Robyn Howard: I’m looking forward to where Tech She Can will go, how much it will grow, how many schools we’ll progress into, a younger age group that we’ll look at and hopefully start to change the ratio for women in tech.

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The Tech She Can Charter

Technology & Innovation, PwC United Kingdom

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