Diversity Pay Report

Our commitment

At PwC we are committed to creating an inclusive workplace culture where everyone can reach their full potential. The transparency and accountability that pay gap reporting brings is crucial in driving greater equality in the workplace. We first voluntarily published our gender pay gap data in 2014, and were one of only a handful of companies to do so at the time. 

Since then we have held ourselves accountable to disclose beyond the regulatory requirements. We published our pay and bonus gaps to include Partners, who are currently excluded under the reporting requirements, and we were also one of the first firms to publish our ethnicity pay and bonus gaps. 

We are pleased to report that we have seen a reduction in nearly all of our pay gaps from 2018. This reflects progress against our five-point action plan. The majority of our gaps continue to be driven by the fact there are fewer ethnic minorities and females in senior roles within our business. However, this is different from equal pay. At PwC we are confident that our people are paid equally for doing equivalent jobs across our business and we continue to take action to address any gaps and to make sure our policies and practices are fair. You can find out more about our approach to pay here.


Our gender data in detail

The above graphic shows our group gender pay information and inclusive of Partners. In addition, we are legally required to report under UK gender pay gap reporting legislation, on each of our employing entities with more than 250 employees, which you can find here. 

A mean gap is a calculation of the average hourly pay or bonus of a man in our organisation versus the average hourly pay of a woman, including all relevant additional payments and regardless of what they do in our organisation. 

A median gap is a calculation of the exact mid-point between the lowest and highest-paid man in the organisation versus the equivalent woman. 

Quartiles are calculated by ranking the pay for each employee from lowest to highest. This list is then divided into four equal sized groups of men and women. To the right it shows the percentage of men and women in each of these groups.

Gender   gender pay gap (mean)
gender pay gap (median)
gender bonus gap (mean) gender bonus gap (median) males receiving bonus pay females receiving bonus pay
PwC UK At 5 April 2019 9.70% 7.00% 30.60% 28.20% 91.90% 92.30%
PwC UK At 5 April 2018 12.20% 11.30% 37.80% 37.30% 67.70% 70.30%
PwC UK At 5 April 2017 13.70% 14.20% 37.50% 39.50% 72.60% 74.30%
PwC Services Ltd At 5 April 2019 8.20% 6.90% 29.10% 28.30% 91.60% 92.10%
PwC LLP At 5 April 2019 29.90% 31.70% 49.80% 60.20% 95.70% 94.00%
Staff and Partner Combined * 2019 40.90% 14.70%        

* The pay gap including partners reflects actual partner income for FY19 together with a snapshot of actual employee total cash for FY19 (30 June pay plus bonus payments for the FY19 financial year).

    Lower Quartile Lower Middle Quartile Upper Middle Quartile Top Quartile
Population   Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
PwC UK (includes all staff) At 5 April 2019 52.20% 47.80% 46.90% 53.10% 51.30% 48.70% 58.00% 42.00%
PwC Services Ltd At 5 April 2019 53.40% 46.60% 49.00% 51.00% 51.70% 48.30% 58.60% 41.40%
PwC LLP At 5 April 2019 17.60% 82.40% 40.40% 59.60% 47.30% 52.70% 60.20% 39.80%
Staff and Partner Combined 2019 49.90% 50.10% 46.30% 53.70% 51.90% 48.10% 66.10% 33.90%

Our BAME data in detail

By law, we are only required to calculate and disclose our gender pay figures. Behind the scenes, we are continually assessing pay from a range of other perspectives, including in relation to our ethinc minority employees. We are committed to ensuring we are an inclusive workplace in all aspects, so we have voluntarily analysed and published our ethnicity statistics for the past three years. This data has been produced on the same basis as our regulatory gender pay data. 

Whilst our pay and bonus figures below show gaps in favour of non-ethnic minority employees, our further analysis has shown that this is caused by having fewer ethnic minority employees in our senior, more highly paid roles. 

This is a real area of focus for us and one that we are addressing through our five-point action plan.

BAME Year BAME pay gap (mean)
BAME pay gap (median)
BAME bonus gap (mean) BAME bonus gap (median) BAME  receiving bonus pay Non-BAME receiving bonus pay
PwC UK At 5 April 2019 10.80% 4.70% 39.40% 47.20% 91.40% 94.70%
PwC UK At 5 April 2018 13.50% 10.10% 33.80% 31.30% 59.60% 72.00%
PwC Services Ltd At 5 April 2019 6.70% 1.10% 33.10% 42.30% 91.50% 94.60%
PwC LLP At 5 April 2019 17.90% 20.60% 39.40% 54.00% 89.90% 95.40%
Staff and Partner Combined * 2019 34.70% 6.30%        

* The pay gap including partners reflects actual partner income for FY19 together with a snapshot of actual employee total cash for FY19 (30 June pay plus bonus payments for the FY19 financial year).

    Lower Quartile Lower Middle Quartile Upper Middle Quartile Top Quartile
Population Year NB B NB B NB B NB B
PwC UK At 5 April 2019 77.40% 22.60% 67.00% 33.00% 69.60% 30.40% 81.20% 18.80%
PwC Services Ltd At 5 April 2019 77.80% 22.20% 66.30% 33.70% 67.90% 32.10% 77.30% 22.70%
PwC LLP At 5 April 2019 84.40% 15.60% 85.70% 14.30% 93.10% 6.90% 91.30% 8.70%
Staff and Partner Combined 2019 75.10% 24.90% 68.00% 32.00% 70.10% 29.90% 83.30% 16.70%

What are we doing about it?

We are pleased to be making progress but we know we still have work to do. Here you can find our five-point action plan, and more information on the actions we’re taking to address the areas where we know we can have the biggest impact.

Find out more

We can confirm the data reported is accurate. 

 

Kevin Ellis
PwC UK Chairman and Senior Partner

Laura Hinton
Chief People Officer

Contact us

Sarah Churchman

OBE, Chief Inclusion, Community & Wellbeing Officer, PwC United Kingdom

Jane Turner

Director, PwC United Kingdom

Tel: +44 7801 033505

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